Witch Wicca are you?

 |  by  |  featured, Sorceress

sorceress

Wicca was everywhere a decade ago. Women, particularly teenage girls, would declare themselves witches, seek the patronage of ancient gods, celebrate the solstice, and dance in the moonlight.

Despite its popularity, I didn’t take much interest in Wicca or its Wiccan practitioners.  And soon enough it faded from public consciousness and was rarely mentioned in the media or in conversation.

Which makes my decision to borrow a Wiccan book somewhat curious.

I’d run into a work colleague at the local library and after we’d finished consoling each other about returning to work after a fortnight’s break (we teach teenagers — enough said), I picked up my books and was about to leave when the Wicca Bible caught my gaze.

I flipped through it and placed it back on the shelf.  But then I hesitated, picked it up again, and borrowed it.

Was this a random act or was it pre-ordained? According to the Wicca Bible there is a meaning attached to random events and coincidences. Perhaps it was a pagan god demanding attention — particularly since I’ve spent a lifetime oblivious of their presence.

Wicca is a mixture of ancient beliefs, meditation, spiritual, physical and divination practices. Dreams, intuition, visualisation, observation and rituals are thrown in, too.

Our ancestors — particularly the Celts — would recognise Wicca.

Its appeal lies in cultivating physical and mental wellbeing.

Wicca’s also a reminder of how disconnected we are from our ancestors and what gave their lives meaning. We neither practise nor learn the ancient rites that once sustained each generation. We remain oblivious of nature’s power and of forces beyond our understanding.

We have lost a fundamental piece of our collective heritage, leaving us detached and ignorant.

It’s time to reintroduce Wicca’s ancient wisdom — minus its witchcraft associations.

This would help us to acknowledge Wicca’s contribution to our past as well as allow us to consider its potential as a guide to a more enlightened future.

Reference
The Wicca Bible by Ann-Marie Gallagher

Related Post:
The 21st Century made in China suburban witch

Comments

comments

About the author

Sue Bell is an entertainment writer and author of Backpacked: A mostly true story, Beat Street and When Dreamworks came to Stanley.


No Comments


Trackbacks

  1. The 21st century made in China suburban witch - midlifexpress | midlifexpress

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.